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What’s Christianity Got To Do With The Environment?

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by Matt Humphrey

The Bible has quite a bit to say about the environment – far more than can be fit into a tidy article! Nevertheless, at the risk of painting with too big a brush, here are a few important biblical themes that lay the groundwork for an ethic of Creation Care:

1. What is humanity’s place in Creation?

Throughout Christian history we have tended to read the Bible as though human life was all God was interested in. However, the biblical vision is one of all Creation flourishing with human beings as God’s appointed stewards and safeguards of it all. Our “caring for and keeping” the garden (Gen 2:15) and our “ruling over and subduing” Creation (Gen 1: 26-28) are the fitting actions of a human life rightly oriented towards God, our neighbors, and all of Creation.

This world belongs to God and was created out of love. “The whole earth is the Lord’s and everything in it,” declares the psalmist (24:1), building on the Genesis account of God delighting in all of Creation and declaring it “very good.” The praise which the psalmist offers to God in worship is the fitting response to God’s gracious work of creating and sustaining all that is. We are born into a world in which all of our needs are provided for by the hand of a generous and loving God. And not just our “needs” – if God were only interested in our “needs” we would have a far simpler world! Consider the sheer variety of finches and fish. This is not about necessity but abundance! And the Bible clearly proclaims this abundant world was made and is everywhere sustained by a God who loves it.

2. What is the problem?

The reality of human disobedience and brokenness – what the Bible calls sin – is not just about disobedience to God, but also the fracturing of our core human identity. Our relationships with God, other humans, and all Creation are now broken.

Hosea 4:1-3 puts it cogently: “Hear the word of the Lord, O people of Israel; for the Lord has an indictment against the inhabitants of the land. There is no faithfulness, no love of God, and no knowledge of God in the land. Swearing, lying, and murder, and stealing and adultery break out; bloodshed follows bloodshed. Therefore the land mourns, and all who live in it languish; together with the wild animals and the birds of the air, even the fish of the sea are perishing.”

This motif of havoc is echoed by many prophets. While human beings have the great and holy role of being stewards and safeguards of Creation, their failure to do this leads quite quickly to the chaos the prophets envision, a chaos we can relate to today as refugees from environmental degradation reach historic levels and the land lies polluted under our feet.

3. What is our hope?

The New Testament offers a hopeful vision of redemption. Colossians 1:15-20 states, “It was the Father’s good pleasure for all the fullness to dwell in Him (Jesus), and through Him to reconcile to Himself all things, having made peace through the blood of His cross; whether things on earth or things in heaven.” It is explicitly clear–God is reconciling all things to Himself through Christ.

God’s redemption and reconciliation is not just about humanity – it is cosmic in scope! Paul writes in Romans, “Creation waits eagerly for the revealing of the children of God” (8:19). God’s New Creation is in the process of being born right now! God is at work in the world “making all things new” (Revelation 21:5). Our great fortune is participating in that work and bearing witness to the life and ways of Jesus in all that we do.

The future which New Testament writers anticipate is “a new heaven and a new earth” —one cleansed from the effects of human sin and violence, reconciled to God, and with redeemed image bearers walking in the ways of Jesus. This, I suggest, is the heart of the biblical vision of earthkeeping. If God’s future promises the reconciliation of all things, then we have work to do in the present caring for all things the way God does. We respond to the great hope of Christ’s resurrection and give our lives towards this vision of all Creation restored, reconciled, and flourishing.

Matt and his wife Roxy serve as Community Life Coordinators and are passionate about Brooksdale’s internship program, fruit trees, chickens and slow food.

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Good Seed Sunday is April 24th

2016 Date Announced

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Celebrated on the first Sunday after Earth Day, Good Seed Sunday is helping Christians across Canada honour the Creator as they celebrate creation. Check out our long list of Free Downloadable resources at goodseedsunday.arocha.ca

From sermons to Sunday school materials to liturgies we have everything you need to help your congregation truly celebrate this important day.

Click here for our downloads page

“Why should I care for creation?”

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Colossians 1:15-20

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The Son is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation. For in him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things have been created through him and for him. He is before all things, and in him all things hold together. And he is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning and the firstborn from among the dead, so that in everything he might have the supremacy. For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross.

Colossians 1:15-20

Devotional by Ephie Risho | Photo by Emily Upcott

Colossians 1 is a powerful portrayal of the supremacy of Jesus Christ. Though human, and born of a regular person, he somehow also existed before creation, for “all things have been created through him.” As if this isn’t puzzling enough, we see that, in this passage, God uses Christ to reconcile “all things” to himself. “All things” is quite the all-encompassing phrase. Typical Christian doctrine often looks at the sacrifice of Christ as being blood shed for all of humanity. Whether Jew, Greek, male, female, free or slave, Jesus died for our sake. But, according to this passage, Jesus died for far more than us. He died for everything – planets, stars, trees, lakes – everything.

And, in the midst of all of this reconciling, we are confronted with an amazing insight: Jesus, with “all of God’s fullness dwelling in him,” is the head of the body, the church. We, God’s people, are the arms and legs of Jesus. Our primary calling is to live out Jesus’ mission here on this earth!

If we trace God’s mission through Scripture, we see a climax in the life of Jesus. Throughout both the Old and New Testament, we read how God is working toward the reconciliation of all people and all creation – a new Heaven and new earth. What an amazing privilege, and responsibility, to be included in this mission through Jesus!

In the meantime, all of creation – including us – is groaning. Sin and suffering continue to abound everywhere we look. Thankfully, we have hope through Jesus that our trials on this earth are short-lived, but let’s not live only for that future union with Jesus. Our time on earth is precious and short. Every day we have the opportunity to live as Jesus’ arms and legs and carry out his purposes to reconcile all things to God.

In a world of brokenness, it can be overwhelming to know where to begin. Thank God we aren’t responsible for changing the earth – God will do this with or without us. But how much better will our lives and future be if we play an important role in that mission? Thank God for the Spirit, who will empower and guide us, and without which our efforts would be in vain.

God desires to have a deep relationship with us, which in turn will develop our relationship with other people and with creation. It is time for us to turn to God for our own redemption, and thus be empowered to play a role in the reconciliation of all things.

Prayer: God, how do you want to start reconciling my relationship with your world?

A Rocha Canada is excited to count down the weeks until Good Seed Sunday on April 26, 2015! We will be sharing one devotional from our Free Resources page every Saturday on our blog. Visit again next week for some more creation care encouragement.

Download the pdf version of this week’s devotional.

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